Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report 2022 Released by US State Department

Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report 2022 Released by US State Department

Annual Report which reveals what the Human Trafficking situation is Worldwide

https://www.state.gov/reports/2022-trafficking-in-persons-report/

Refer to our blog posted in 2021 which explains the different levels of Tier Levels  which countries have been categorized into- click on the link below

https://www.actafrica.org.za/trafficking-in-personstip-report-2021-released-by-us-state-department/

What You Can Do to Prevent Human Trafficking and Improve the Situation in Your Country- click on the links below

https://www.actafrica.org.za/human-trafficking

https://www.actafrica.org.za/it-is-your-business-how-to-protect-your-children-online/

#worlddayagainsttraffickinginpersons💢
#endhumantrafficking❌
#endchildtrafficking❌
#endgenderbasedviolence❌

“EVIL PREVAILS WHEN GOOD PEOPLE DO NOTHING *

Should you wish to donate to help us fight and  break the cycles of  these vicious atrocities of Human Trafficking and Gender based Violence  especially during these perilous times and far into the future, You will be assisting and enabling us to fulfill  our mission to Save Lives Through Awareness and Education.

#Donate today How To Take Advantage of Tax-Deductible Donations to Charities

Your donation will be used for the sustainability of our projects and the organisation.

Our banking details are:

Account holder: Awareness for Child Trafficking Africa (ACT Africa)

Bank:  First National Bank

Account Number:62827188237

Branch Code 256055

Swift Code FIRNZAJJ

Email Proof of Donation to accounts@actafrica.org.za

OR

Click on the link below

https://www.payfast.co.za/donate/go/awarenessforchildtraffickingafricaactafric

 

 

HUMAN TRAFFICKING!

HUMAN TRAFFICKING!

What is Human Trafficking

 The Act (What is done)

Recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons

The Means (How it is done)

Threat or use of force, coercion, abduction, fraud, deception, abuse of power or vulnerability, or giving payments or benefits to a person in control of the victim

The Purpose (Why it is done)

For the purpose of exploitation, which includes exploiting the prostitution of others, sexual exploitation, forced labour, slavery or similar practices and the removal of organs.

To ascertain whether a particular circumstance constitutes trafficking in persons, consider the definition of trafficking in the Trafficking in Persons Protocol and the constituent elements of the offense, as defined by relevant domestic legislation.

How Do Human Traffickers Lure Victims

Common methods used to traffick humans include forms of deception like:

  • Seduction and romance,
  • False job advertisements,
  • Lies about educational or travel opportunities,
  • Abduction,
  • Sale by family, and.
  • Recruitment through former slaves.

Traffickers employ a variety of control tactics, the most common include physical and emotional abuse and threats, isolation from friends and family, and economic abuse. They make promises aimed at addressing the needs of their target in order to impose control.

How to Spot a Trafficker

Traffickers will tell you that parents, teachers and others adults don’t understand or appreciate you.

They will make you feel wanted and secure. They prey on young people’s hopes or dreams to improve

their lives.

*If you’re with friends, traffickers know how to get you to leave your friends.

*Women and children your age can be recruiters for traffickers. It’s not just suspicious older men.

*You cannot tell a trafficker by his/her looks, age, socioeconomic level, daytime job or clothes.

*If an older guy tells you that you are mature for your age, he probably wants something you’re not old

enough for. Traffickers will trick you into believing they are your “boyfriend” and shower you with gifts.

*The people you care about the most will be the first to help you when you get in trouble so the trafficker

will try to get you to turn against them.

*If you appear desperate or needy, a trafficker will figure out what you need and offer it to you.

Where you might find a trafficker:

Online (Facebook, Instagram…), the mall, your school, movie theaters, water/amusement parks, church, any place there

are lots of young people

How to Protect Yourself from Human Trafficking

  • 10 Ways To Protect Yourself From Human Trafficking. Everyday there are chilling reports of abducted women and children in South Africa. This form of modern day slavery involves people abducting, luring or pressuring victims for the purpose of using them for forced labour or forced sexual acts for money. Young women are the most likely to be trafficked and forced to become sex slaves, prostitutes, workers or even street beggars. The following points will help you to be safe, and please share with family members and friends.

 

  • Be Vigilant of Your Surroundings

Always be vigilant and aware of your surroundings. People are often distracted by their phones or other little things when walking. Make sure that you’re aware of what’s going on around you so that you can spot when something is off. If you notice a person or a car following you, alert someone you trust immediately.

  • Avoid Walking Alone

Women have been forcibly kidnapped while walking on the street. You shouldn’t have to be restricted when you go out and it may seem unfair that you always have to be on the lookout, but for your own safety, try not to walk alone – especially in quiet areas.

  • Act Swiftly If Suspicious

Go into the nearest building and wait for the person or car to leave. Alert someone in the building that you’re being followed or call someone to pick you up if you can. Also, let someone you know that you’re going out and what time they can expect you to arrive at your destination.

  • Don’t Trust Easily

Some people who are trafficked are approached by strangers offering them a job or some kind of opportunity (like a modelling or singing career). Traffickers can approach you anywhere, on social media, at school, in the mall and even outside your house. Some traffickers might try to befriend you or form a relationship with you so that you trust them enough. Women can also be traffickers and are often used to lure victims because they seem more trusting than men.

  • Use Social Media Wisely

Be suspicious of strangers who approach you after you’ve posted something personal on your social media profile and their suddenly offering you help, advice, money, a place to stay or a job opportunity. If you’re getting random messages from people on social media, check your privacy settings, turn off your location settings on social media and only make your posts visible to your friends (not to the public). Also avoid checking in to places on social media (while you’re at the place especially).

  • Be Ready For Anything

Carry pepper spray with you on your key-chain. You also need to mentally prepare yourself to fight off the abductor. If you begin to be attacked, make a scene, yell for help, and fight back like your life depends on it (because it probably does)

  • Use Your Phone

Allow 3 of your closest friends or family members to track your phone via GPS so they know your whereabouts at all times.  You can do with on most cell phones and allow a select few to have access to your location for 1 hour, 1 day, or indefinitely.

  • Trust Your Instincts

Listen to the intuitive voice inside your head. Check with family and friends for advice if you get offers that are too good to be true. Do Internet searches or background checks on the person wanting you to meet with them. Say no and see how they react. Look for signs of abusive or possessive behaviors. Is the person trying to isolate or turn you against family and friends? If so, avoid that person.

  • Meet Strangers In Public Places

Don’t let anyone know where you live until you get to know them. So for a date, meet them at a public place for the first few times until you get to know them and feel comfortable. Also stay in contact with friends and family if you’re out and about alone or with someone you don’t know very well.

  • Seek Help From Reliable Organizations

Traffickers also prey on young people who run away from home. If you’re having trouble at home, instead of running away and putting yourself at risk of being kidnapped or lured into dangerous, life-threatening situations by traffickers, rather seek help. You can seek counselling by calling Childline on 0800 055 555 or the South African Depression and Anxiety Group (SADAG) on 0800 12 13 14

How to Stop Human Trafficking

  •  Fundraise for Human Trafficking Organisations so they can remain in existence to continue fighting human trafficking
  • Volunteer your time, services and resources to Human Trafficking Organisations
  • Hold events to raise awareness.Raising awareness for human trafficking can also get more people involved and interested in joining the fight. It can create a chain reaction, leading to more people lobbying, fundraising and educating themselves. Regardless of what the event is, they are efficient ways to raise awareness for a cause and gain new followers.
  • Help Survivors by donating clothes and other goods to shelters for victims of human trafficking. Also, encourage businesses to give jobs to survivors, helping them get back on their feet and get a fresh start. If applicable, offering legal advice to survivors allows them an opportunity to not only move forward but to gain justice. Helping survivors and contributing to their recovery stops the cycle of trauma in its tracks and ensures it won’t repeat itself. Stay informed by following relevant organizations on social media, read reportsas they are released

  • Report Suspicions to the Human Trafficking Resource Line (0800 222 777)/ SAPS (10111) / Childline (116)
  • Help Combat the Demand For Cheap Labour by boycotting products and companies that permit human trafficking. The Dept of Labour will be able to provide a list.

#endhumantrafficking #endchildtrafficking #endgenderbasedviolence

“EVIL PREVAILS WHEN GOOD PEOPLE DO NOTHING *

Should you wish to donate to help us fight and  break the cycles of  these vicious atrocities of Human Trafficking and Gender based Violence  especially during these perilous times and far into the future, You will be assisting and enabling us to fulfill  our mission to Save Lives Through Awareness and Education.

#Donate today How To Take Advantage of Tax-Deductible Donations to Charities

Your donation will be used for the sustainability of our projects and the organisation.

Our banking details are:

Account holder: Awareness for Child Trafficking Africa (ACT Africa)

Bank:  First National Bank

Account Number:62827188237

Branch Code 256055

Swift Code FIRNZAJJ

Email Proof of Donation to accounts@actafrica.org.za

OR

Click on the link below

https://www.payfast.co.za/donate/go/awarenessforchildtraffickingafricaactafric

PLEASE DO NOT ABANDON YOUR BABY OR CHILD…

PLEASE DO NOT ABANDON YOUR BABY OR CHILD…

WHAT IS ABANDONMENT?

Relinquishing interests and claims over one’s offspring in an illegal way, with the intent of never resuming or reasserting guardianship  AND leaving a child younger than 12 months in a public or private place with the intent of terminating their care for the child, also referredto as BABY DUMPING.

RISKS OF ABANDONMENT

Emotional and Mental Risks: low self-esteem, difficulty emotionally attaching and trusting other caregivers, guilt, anxiety, clinginess, insomnia, eating disorders and depression

Security/Physical Risks: Death, Vulnerability to Paedophiles, Child Trafficking for the purposes of illegal adoption, child sex trafficking, organ harvesting which comprises of any one or more of the following such as for the purposes of muti, illegal ritual practices, illegal organ transplants. 

STATISTICS OF ABANDONMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA

As per article in Daily Maverick 21/10/2020 – By the beginning of June, 26  baby homes reported an intake of 58 abandoned babies over the first two months of lockdown. Media reports for the same time (as well as June and early July) detail 50 abandonments – mostly babies – found in sewerage pipes, the open veld, rubbish dumps, in shallow graves, buckets, streets, outside homes and most tragically, in a dustbin a few meters away from a baby saver. Thirty-two (two-thirds) of these children were found dead.These statistics include an unusually high number of older children, all with heartbreaking stories. https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2020-10-21-the-truth-behind-sas-shocking-child-abandonment-statistics/

The National Adoption Coalition of South Africa estimated that in 2020, out of a total of 83 infants found unsafely abandoned, only 34 were found alive and the other 49 were found dead

As per article in Sowetan 07/06/2022– More than 1 000 children in South Africa have been abandoned by their parents over the past two years. The shocking data was revealed by the Minister of Social Development Lindiwe Zulu in response to a parliamentary question this week.https://sundayworld.co.za/news/shockingly-large-number-of-sa-children-are-abandoned/

The minister said in the period from April 2019 to March 2020, a total of 589 children were reported abandoned, while from April 2020 to March 2021, a total of 435 kids were abandoned.

LEGAL CONSEQUENCES:

Child abandonment is a criminal offence, and a person who abandons a child after birth may be charged and prosecuted. Charges could include crimes such as concealment of birth and attempted murder.

What to do should you find yourself for whatever reason not being able or wanting to keep your child:

LEGAL ADOPTION IS THE ONLY SAFE ALTERNATIVE.

Contact a social worker. They can help with placing the child in foster care or adoption programmes. If that’s not possible, the social worker can also assist with placing the child in a youth care centre.

Whilst there are baby sanctuaries and centres deemed safe like the police stations, churches, child and youth care centres where one can go to and request help, Know that in South Africa it is a criminal offence to just abandon a child.

The Children’s Act 38 of 2005 intends:

  • to give effect to certain rights of children as contained in the Constitution;
  • to set out principles relating to the care and protection of children;
  • to define parental responsibilities and rights;
  • to make further provision regarding children’s courts;
  • to provide for the issuing of contribution orders;
  • to make new provision for the adoption of children;
  • to provide for inter-country adoption;
  • to give effect to the Hague Convention on Inter-country Adoption;
  • to prohibit child abduction and to give effect to the Hague Convention on International Child Abduction;
  • to provide for surrogate motherhood;
  • to create certain new offences relating to children; and
  • to provide for matters connected therewith.

https://www.gov.za/documents/childrens-act

Four principles of theUN Convention on the Rights of the Child
  • Non-Discrimination.
  • Best interests of the child Children. …
  • The right to survival and development. …
  • The views of the child.

https://www.unicef.org.uk/what-we-do/un-convention-child-rights/#:~:text=What%20is%20the%20UN%20Convention%3F,human%20rights%20treaty%20in%20history.

Extract from an article by The Conversation on 20 July 2020

Baby savers around the world

So what is a baby saver? It is also referred to as a baby safe, baby box and the babyklappen (in Germany). The saver allows a mother or relinquishing person to anonymously and safely leave an infant in a box-like structure built in to a wall. An alarm is triggered when the infant is placed inside and emergency medical teams or first responders are immediately notified. The infant is collected and taken to a place of safety.

Currently there are 35 organisations that have actively introduced baby savers in South Africa. The first was the Door of Hope Children’s Mission, established in 1999 despite the absence of legal backing. To date 240 babies have been saved through this facility.

These organisations provide a space for mothers to safely give up their babies. Babies found after surviving unsafe abandonment are also brought to these organisations. But without legalisation the areas in which these savers are located are not widely publicised. This limits the access desperate mothers have to them and this also impedes the establishment of further savers in South Africa.

Unsafe infant abandonment is not unique to South Africa. Many countries around the world face this harsh reality, but some have developed alternatives. They may do it in different ways but they all aim to safeguard the child’s right to life.

The first legalisation of the use of a baby saver was through the Baby Moses law enacted in Texas in 1999 after a spate of unsafe abandonments state-wide left 33 abandoned infants dead out of a total of 105. This was closely followed by Germany, which implemented the use of the babyklappen in 2000. Between 2001 and 2007, 143 infants were safely relinquished in these safes.

In January 2019, Namibia became the only African country to introduce baby safe haven laws.

https://theconversation.com/south-african-women-needing-to-abandon-their-babies-dont-have-safe-options-this-must-change-163992 

The Process of Adoption:

  • Orientation session where all the details are explained.
  • Complete the application forms and return them to the agency.
  • Complete a personal profile and return it to the agency.
  • Apply for a police clearance certificate.
  • Undergo psychometric testing.
  • An interview with a social worker.

Giving a child up for adoption isn’t always easy, the decision requires a lot of thought to ensure that it will be in the best interest of the child. Child protection organisations and the Department of Social Development will provide guidance and support services to assist you throughout the process.

How the process works

In terms of section 233(4) of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005, a person must prove that he or she was counselled by an adoption social worker before signing permission for the adoption.

The presiding officer must explain in private to the parent exactly how and when all parental rights will be transferred to the adoptive parents. Legal guardians must go through this same procedure, this includes the maternal grandparents in the case of a minor birth mother, as well as the child if the child is over the age of 10.

Two different, but equally legal, ways of adoption are possible in terms of the Children’s Act:

  • disclosed adoption: where the parties know each other’s identity, for instance, stepfamily or foster parents, or
  • non-disclosed adoption: when a child is matched with non-relatives unknown to the parents.

Giving consent

Both the mother and the father must consent to the adoption by a specific person or persons. If the child is 10 years and older, the child must also consent to the adoption. If the child is in foster care, the foster parents must also certify that they don’t wish to adopt the child.

One can give consent in the following way:

  • If you’re a parent or guardian of the child, complete Form 61, the parent or guardian must give consent for a child to be adopted.
  • If you’re a child that’s 10 years of age or older, complete Form 62, the child must give consent to their adoption.
  • One must give consent in writing. In South Africa, the person or persons giving the consent must sign it in the presence of a presiding officer of the children’s court, who shall then attest to the consent.
  • The consent should contain the names of the proposed adoptive parents. If it is in the child’s best interest, the children’s court may admit consent by the child’s parents or guardian which doesn’t contain the names or any other particulars of the proposed adoptive parents.

AdoptionConsent isn’t necessary (this isn’t automatic, as the court needs to make a factual finding) if:

  • the child is an orphan and has no guardian or caregiver who is willing and able to adopt the child and the court is provided with certified copies of the child’s parents or guardians death certificate or such other documentation as may be required by the court;
  • the parent or guardian is incompetent to give consent due to mental illness;
  • the parent or guardian has abandoned the child, or if the whereabouts of that parent or guardian can’t be established, or if the identity of that parent or guardian is unknown;
  • the parent or guardian has abused or deliberately neglected the child, or has allowed the child to be abused or deliberately neglected;
  • the parent or guardian has consistently failed to fulfil his or her parental responsibilities towards the child during the last 12 months;
  • the parent or guardian has been divested by an order of a court of the right to consent to the adoption of the child; or
  • the parent or guardian has failed to respond to a notice of the proposed adoption (referred to in section 238 of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005) within 30 days of service of the notice.

Biological parents can withdraw their consent within 60 days of signing the consent form by signing a Form 64.https://www.westerncape.gov.za/service/giving-child-adoption                    https://adoption.org.za/childrens-act/

THERE IS HELP..!!

CONTACT DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: Customer Care Help line: 012 312 7727.  Email: info@dsd.gov.za Website: http://www.dsd.gov.za.

 

PLEASE DO NOT ABANDON YOUR BABY OR CHILD, PROTECT YOURSELF, YOUR BABY OR CHILD BY ASKING FOR HELP INSTEAD…

#abandonment # childabuse #childprotection #baby # help #parenthood #baby #child #mother #father

#endhumantrafficking #endchildtrafficking #endgenderbasedviolence

#let’slookafterourchildren 

Should you wish to donate to help us fight and  break the cycles of  these vicious atrocities of Human Trafficking and Gender based Violence  especially during these perilous times and far into the future, You will be assisting and enabling us to fulfill  our mission to Save Lives Through Awareness and Education.

#Donate today How To Take Advantage of Tax-Deductible Donations to Charities

Your donation will be used for the sustainability of our projects and the organisation.

Our banking details are:

Account holder: Awareness for Child Trafficking Africa (ACT Africa)

Bank:  First National Bank

Account Number:62827188237

Branch Code 256055

Swift Code FIRNZAJJ

Email Proof of Donation to accounts@actafrica.org.za

OR

Click on the link below

https://www.payfast.co.za/donate/go/awarenessforchildtraffickingafricaactafrica

 

National Child Protection Week South Africa

National Child Protection Week South Africa

 29 May – 5 June 2022 is Child Protection Week in SA🇿🇦

National Child Protection Week is commemorated in the country annually to raise awareness of the rights of children as articulated in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa and Children’s Act (Act No. 38 of 2005).

The aim of Child Protection Week (CPW) in South Africa is to raise awareness on the need to protect children against abuse, exploitation, neglect and all forms of violence. South Africans can support Child Protection Week by ensuring that the most vulnerable in our society do not suffer abuse.

The 5 P’s in Child Protection:

Children’s (NI) Order 1995 The 5 key principles of the Children’s Order 1995 are known as the 5 P’s: Prevention, Paramountcy, Partnership, Protection and Parental Responsibility.

Get help

The Department of Social Development has a pilot a 24-hour call centre dedicated to provide support and counselling to victims of gender-based violence:

The toll-free number to call is 0800 428 428 (0800 GBV GBV) to speak to a social worker for assistance and counselling.

Callers can also request a social worker from the Command Centre to contact them by dialling *120*7867# (free) from any cell phone.

Yout can also get help at:

Childline South Africa: 116

Child Welfare South Africa:
0861 4 CHILD (24453) /
011 452-4110 /                                                          ⁸email: info@childwelfaresa.org.za

How to Protect Children Online, please refer to the link below:

https://www.actafrica.org.za/it-is-your-business-how-to-protect-your-children-online/

https://www.gov.za/ChildProtectionWeek2022

https://www.gov.za/documents/childrens-act

https://emergency.unhcr.org/entry/43381/child-protection 

https://www.asudmalawi.org/child-protection/#:~:text=Children’s%20(NI)%20Order%201995%20The,Partnership%2C%20Protection%20and%20Parental%20Responsibility.

#africa.                                            #southafrica🇿🇦                      #childprotection.                    #saveourchildren                    #endchildabuse                                 #endhumantrafficking                      #endchildtrafficking #endgenderbasedviolence              #savinglivesthroughawarenessandeducation

 

“EVIL PREVAILS WHEN GOOD PEOPLE DO NOTHING *

Should you wish to donate to help us fight and  break the cycles of  these vicious atrocities of Human Trafficking and Gender based Violence  especially during these perilous times and far into the future, You will be assisting and enabling us to fulfill  our mission to Save Lives Through Awareness and Education.

#Donate today How To Take Advantage of Tax-Deductible Donations to Charities

Your donation will be used for the sustainability of our projects and the organisation.

Our banking details are:

Account holder: Awareness for Child Trafficking Africa (ACT Africa)

Bank:  First National Bank

Account Number:62827188237

Branch Code 256055

Swift Code FIRNZAJJ

Email Proof of Donation to accounts@actafrica.org.za

OR

Click on the link below

https://www.payfast.co.za/donate/go/awarenessforchildtraffickingafricaactafric

Human/Child Trafficking Awareness – Schools Tour 3rd to 13th May 2022

Human/Child Trafficking Awareness – Schools Tour 3rd to 13th May 2022

INNOCENCE LOST

Based on a True Story

Innocence Lost as described in our previous blog is a play on Child Trafficking by the National Childrens’s Theatre SA and with the support of ACT Africa was showcased to 23 schools in human trafficking hotspots in and around Gauteng.

The actors from NCT along with ACT Africa travelled daily for the two weeks with such determination, perseverance and heart to showcase the play in order to bring about the much needed and vital Human/Child Trafficking to in excess of four  thousand  youth from Grade 6 to Grade 12.  This was an eye opener for  the youth as well as adults (educators) present and was excellenty received at the schools. Yes, this was not your usual awareness it was done in the form of a theatrical performance which was engaging and impactful. Most of the children at these schools have never seen or been exposed to a Theatrical performance, so whilst this was to bring about awareness it was also a real cultural treat for the children.and this was evident too from their reactions. Going to the theatre for most of them is not even on their agendas due to poverty and not being able to afford to go as well just never being privy to being exposed to just the thought of attending a theatre show and now this was brought to them, to their schools ….An experience the children will not easily forget. https://youtu.be/4tFl9SpADbQ

The experience was bitter sweet .  As this much needed awareness was brought, so we could see that what was being showcased – abuse, rape, human trafficking – was a normal way of life for them and accepted as such.  Innocence Lost Child Trafficking Awareness play brought about the stark reality that these evils/atrocities plaguing our children, our homes, communities, country and the world at large are not normal but is indeed abnormal, must not be kept quiet and that help is there and this flipped the coin for many.  Our first question a young girl asked on our first day was  not about the play but ” Where can one get help” ….that is indicative of a possible abusive situation.  Everyday day for the two weeks children would ask questions as well as come to ACT Africa for help. Reports from educators following this awareness is that children came to speak to their educators too to ask for help and in all cases the appropriate help was provided. Our Youth are going through sheer hell which no child in their lifetime should experience and being robbed of their childhood/ youth as a result of abuse. They developing survival mechanisms to cope which is resulting in behavioural problems because healing is not taking place. Children should not be developing survival mechanisms to cope with daily life,  they should just be children and enjoying their childhood.  So the tragedy of abuse coming to the fore was bitter  but the sweet was that children now realised that they can and should speak out and ask for help.

The showcasing of Innocence Lost  Child Trafficking Awareness play has now ended as well as the Human/Child trafficking awareness it provided due to lack of funding to continue. We have had excellent reports from the public, children, educators and media  https://youtu.be/0PMXkd6oOpk https://twitter.com/Abramjee/status/1523373041928925184?t=qWOk63zXcuKDEmxaYQO1Ww&s=08 but whereto from here?…  Unless we receive the much needed funding to continue the vital and much needed Awareness and Education to break the cycles of Human Trafficking and Gender-based Violence that question will remain unanswered sadly…

I refer to my previous blog which details statistics and the importance of  continued and regular Human Trafficking and Gender-based Violence Awareness and Education in order to break these cycles – https://www.actafrica.org.za/innocence-lost/

We would like to provide Human/Child Trafficking  and Gender -based Violence  Awareness by taking Innocence Lost  Child Trafficking Theatre performance to schools, universiies and wherever else we can throughout South Africa and beyond if possible but cannot do so without Your Help of Funding….

#saveourchildren                                                                        #endhumantrafficking                                                                #endchildtrafficking                                                                          #endchildabuse                                                              #endgenderbasedviolence                                                                          #schools                                                                                                        #africa                                                  #savinglivesthroughawarenessandeducation

 

“EVIL PREVAILS WHEN GOOD PEOPLE DO NOTHING *

Should you wish to donate to help us fight and  break the cycles of  these vicious atrocities of Human Trafficking and Gender based Violence  especially during these perilous times and far into the future, You will be assisting and enabling us to fulfill  our mission to Save Lives Through Awareness and Education.

#Donate today How To Take Advantage of Tax-Deductible Donations to Charities

Your donation will be used for the sustainability of our projects and the organisation.

Our banking details are:

Account holder: Awareness for Child Trafficking Africa (ACT Africa)

Bank:  First National Bank

Account Number:62827188237

Branch Code 256055

Swift Code FIRNZAJJ

Email Proof of Donation to accounts@actafrica.org.za

OR

Click on the link below

https://www.payfast.co.za/donate/go/awarenessforchildtraffickingafricaactafrica

INNOCENCE LOST – SCHOOLS TOUR

INNOCENCE LOST – SCHOOLS TOUR

Innocence Lost 

A Play about Child Trafficking      

National Children’s Theatre presents is a Theatre performance Innocence Lost, a play on Child Trafficking based on true story, with the support of Different.org and KAVOD. The play will tour to schools in and around Gauteng from 3rd May  to 13th May with the support of Awareness for Child Trafficking Africa (ACT Africa).

Innocence Lost will be showcased to schools in some of the areas identified as Human Trafficking hotspots in Gauteng (viz.  Sandton, Mamelodi, Hillbrow, Soweto, Eldorado Park ….)and  hope to take this through to the rest of South Africa if we are able to raise the needed funding.

Of the trafficked victims recorded in Africa, 64% are children. This is a very tragic and bleak crisis prevailing which will worsen if nothing tangible is done.

 

https://www.news24.com/news24/southafrica/news/human-trafficking-recruitment-here-are-some-of-the-hotspots-in-gauteng-20220427

#savinglivesthroughawarenessandeducation    #saveourchildren 💟
#endhumantrafficking ❌
#endchildtrafficking ❌
#actafrica
#schools

“EVIL PREVAILS WHEN GOOD PEOPLE DO NOTHING *

Should you wish to donate to help us fight and  break the cycles of  these vicious atrocities of Human Trafficking and Gender based Violence  especially during these perilous times and far into the future, You will be assisting and enabling us to fulfill  our mission to Save Lives Through Awareness and Education.

#Donate today How To Take Advantage of Tax-Deductible Donations to Charities

Your donation will be used for the sustainability of our projects and the organisation.

Our banking details are:

Account holder: Awareness for Child Trafficking Africa (ACT Africa)

Bank:  First National Bank

Account Number:62827188237

Branch Code 256055

Swift Code FIRNZAJJ

Email Proof of Donation to accounts@actafrica.org.za

OR

Click on the link below

https://www.payfast.co.za/donate/go/awarenessforchildtraffickingafricaactafrica